Pollen - City

Species - Pine

Pine

ALLERGENICITY
Low
POLLEN SEASON
Spring
TYPE
Tree
There are many different species of pine trees, but the most common is Pinus Sylvestris or English or Scots Pine. Pine trees grow to be about 20 feet tall, but the tallest known specimen was measured at over 384 feet!

It is a coniferous evergreen tree.

The pine is a coniferous evergreen tree. It belongs to the pine family, which includes other members such as the spruce, fir and fir tree.

The scientific name for this species is Pinus. The word "pine" comes from Greek for "cone", referring to how its cones look like little cones on top of their branches. This classification includes all gymnosperms (nonflowering plants) except gingkoes and cycads.

Native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and North America.

The tree is native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa and North America. It can be found growing wild in many places around the world including Sri Lanka and Japan.

The pine tree has been cultivated for thousands of years because it grows well in cold climates with little water and low soil fertility. In fact, many people consider it the perfect Christmas tree due to its unique shape that makes them ideal for decorating homes during this season.

The bark on mature trees is thick, scaly and gray-brown.

The bark on mature trees is thick, scaly and gray-brown. This can be seen when you look at the cross section of a pine tree's trunk. It makes up what is known as the cork cambium or phloem tissue. This layer of bark protects the tree from insects and disease. The cork cells are made from dead cells which are separated by water channels used for photosynthesis (the process by which plants make food). During this process new living cells grow outwards from these dead ones until they form a protective bark layer around your pine tree’s trunk!

All parts of the tree are considered toxic by ingestion.

You may have heard that the pine tree is toxic, but do you know why? The reason for this is because all parts of the tree are considered toxic by ingestion. The resin produced from this plant can be used to make turpentine, tar and oil. It's also used to make a type of resin known as pine resin.

The cones are 4–8 cm long, with broad scales; they ripen pale brown about 18 months after pollination.

The cones are 4–8 cm long, with broad scales; they ripen pale brown about 18 months after pollination. The fruit is edible and slightly sweet-tasting when ripe in late summer or early fall.

The pollen is allergenic.

Pine pollen is a common cause of asthma and hay fever. It's also a major trigger for other allergic reactions, including hives and eczema. Pine pollen is released in the spring by male flowers, which grow on pine trees (Pinus species). The pollen then travels through the air as it's carried by wind currents or released from your skin when you sweat or breathe hard.

The pine has long been used in areas with poorly drained or acidic soils, such as in Scandinavia and Finland.

The pine has long been used in areas with poorly drained or acidic soils, such as in Scandinavia and Finland. It can withstand harsh conditions, and it's one of the most important trees in many forests across Europe. The needles are a good source of protein food for animals like rodents and deer, who eat them when they are young enough to digest them easily. The seeds contain so much oil that they can be used as cooking oil!

Read more about Pine at Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/pine
Pine
Image from Wikipedia