Pollen - City

Species - Alder

Alder

ALLERGENICITY
Moderate
POLLEN SEASON
Winter - Spring
TYPE
Tree

Alder trees are deciduous trees in the birch family. They are extremely common in cities near streams, lakes, and rivers. Most alder trees have a red hue to their bark. Red alders grow fast and some can reach heights of up to 200 feet. Some species of alder have male and female cones that hang from the branches. Some are not native to North America and may be invasive to certain areas.

Alder trees are deciduous trees in the birch family.

Alder trees are deciduous trees in the birch family. They're common and fast-growing, making them a popular choice for landscaping projects.

The alder is a shrub or small tree with gray bark that can grow up to 25 feet tall and 12 feet wide. The leaves are oval shaped, veined and smooth on both sides; they're green at first but turn yellowish during summer months. In autumn the tree produces catkins (small flower clusters) which turn reddish brown when mature; these fall off after January or February of each year

The alder is a deciduous tree in the birch family. It is a common and fast-growing tree that can grow up to 25 feet tall and 12 feet wide. The leaves are oval shaped, veined, and smooth on both sides; they're green at first but turn yellowish during summer months. In autumn the tree produces catkins (small flower clusters) which turn reddish brown when mature; these fall off after January or February of each year.

They are extremely common in cities near streams, lakes, and rivers.

Alder trees are extremely common in cities near streams, lakes and rivers. They are also found in wetlands and riparian areas, floodplains, wet meadows and along creeks.

Most alder trees have a red hue to their bark.

The bark of alder tree is usually smooth and green, with a light or dark tone. The bark can be thin or thick depending on the species of tree. Alder trees that grow in coastal areas tend to have thicker bark than those found in inland forests.

Alder trees are also known for their red hues in their bark, which makes them popular shade plants for homes and gardens alike!

Red alders grow fast and some can reach heights of up to 200 feet.

Red alder is a fast-growing tree that can reach heights of up to 200 feet. Red alders are deciduous and members of the birch family, which means they shed their leaves in the fall.

Most species of alder have male and female cones that hang from the branches.

Most species of alder have male and female cones that hang from the branches. The female cones are larger than the male ones and have a bright green, pointed base. They contain six to eight seeds in each cone that ripen from yellow to orange to red before falling off the tree when it dies back in winter or early spring.

Male cones are brown, often with small scales on their surface; they produce no seeds but fertilize females via wind-borne pollen transfer before falling off too once they've ripened in late summer or early fall (depending on species). While there are exceptions—some trees may be monoecious or dioecious depending on where you live—most will have one set of all-male/all-female twins at different times during their life cycle: an early-season transition period followed by an intermediate period where only some parts of each plant bear pollen (usually only part way down), then finally full flowering time where all parts bear pollen equally throughout most days throughout autumn into winter until eventually dying back completely during springtime rains here in California's Central Valley region.

Some are not native to North America and may be invasive to certain areas.

Some alder species are not native to North America and may be invasive in certain areas.

Alder trees, like many other trees in the genus Alnus, have been used by humans for millennia as wood and medicine. The name "alder" comes from the Latin word for "alder tree," alna (plural: alnodae). They are sometimes called yellow-flowered silverberry or Norway-spruce because of their similar appearance; however, these names can also refer to other plants in this family such as elm and birch.

Alder pollen can cause allergy symptoms for some people

If you're allergic to alder pollen, your symptoms may include sneezing, itchy eyes and a runny nose. You may also experience congestion in the morning or at night.

It's important to note that most people who are allergic to alder have mild symptoms; however, some people develop more severe asthma-like symptoms with exposure to this type of pollen. In addition to these common problems with breathing due to pollen allergy (such as sinusitis), there are also some health concerns related specifically with one's immune system:

  • Itchy red eyes
  • Runny nose

Conclusion

Alder trees are deciduous trees in the birch family. They are extremely common in cities near streams, lakes, and rivers. Most alder trees have a red hue to their bark. Red alders grow fast and some can reach heights of up to 200 feet. Some species of alder have male and female cones that hang from the branches. Some are not native to North America and may be invasive to certain areas.

Read more about Alder at Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/alder
Alder
Image from Wikipedia